Other Hair Loss Causes

Other Hair Loss Causes

Alopecia Areata

Alopecia areata (AA) is a recurrent disease, which can cause hairloss in any hair-bearing area. The most common type of alopecia areata presents as round or oval patches of hair loss most noticeably on the scalp or in the eyebrows. The hair usually grows back within 6 months to one year. Most patients will suffer episodes of hair loss in the same area in the future. Those who develop round or oval areas of hair loss can progress to loss of all scalp hair (alopecia totalis). The cause of alopecia areata is unknown but commonly thought to be an autoimmune disorder (the body does not recognize the hair follicles and attacks them). Stress and anxiety are frequently blamed by patients as the cause of their hair loss. The most common treatment is with steroids (cortisone is one form) either topically or by injection. The outcome of treatment is good when the alopecia areata process is present less than one year and poor, especially in adults, if the disease has been present for longer periods of time. Minoxidil (Rogaine®) can help to regrow hair. Surgical treatment of this disorder is not recommended. If you have questions concerning Alopecia areata, please contact an ISHRS physician.

Traction Alopecia

Traction alopecia is caused by chronic traction (pulling) on the hair follicle and is seen most commonly in African-American females associated with tight braiding or cornrow hair styles. It is generally present along the hairline. Men who attach hairpieces to their existing hair can experience this type of permanent hairloss if the hairpiece is attached in the same location over a long period of time. Trichotillomania is a traction alopecia related to a compulsive disorder caused when patients pull on and pluck hairs, often creating bizarre patterns of hairloss. In long term case of trichotillomania, permanent hairloss can occur.

Scarring Alopecia

Hair loss due to scarring of the scalp is called scarring alopecia. Scarring can be due to a variety of causes. Traction alopecia over a period of time may lead to scarring and permanent hair loss. Trichotillomania (compulsive hair-plucking) can cause permanent scalp scarring over time.

Injury to the scalp caused by physical trauma or burns may leave permanent scars and permanent hair loss. Diseases that may cause permanent hair loss due to scalp scarring include (1) the autoimmune conditions lupus erythematosus and scleroderma, and (2) bacterial infections such as folliculitis, fungal infections, and viral infections such as shingles (herpes zoster).

Trichotillomania

Trichotillomania is the name given to habitual, compulsive plucking of hair from the scalp or other hair-bearing areas of the body. Over time, continual plucking of scalp hair will result in a hairless area-a bald spot. Long-term trichotillomania can result in permanent damage to scalp skin and to scarring alopecia. It is not known whether trichotillomania should be classified as a habit or as obsessive-compulsive behavior. In its mildest form, trichotillomania is a habitual plucking of hair while a person reads or watches television. In its more severe forms, trichotillomania has a ritualistic pattern and the hair-plucking may be conducted in front of a mirror. The person with trichotillomania often has guilt feelings about his or her "odd" behavior and will attempt to conceal it.

Triangular Alopecia

The cause of triangular alopecia is not known, but the condition can often be treated medically or surgically. The characteristic pattern of hair loss in triangular alopecia is thinning or complete loss of hair in the scalp area around the temples. If hair loss is not complete, the remaining hairs are often "miniaturized"-fine-textured hairs of thin diameter. Triangular alopecia sometimes begins in childhood with unexplained hair loss in the temporal areas of the scalp.

Telogen Effluvium

Telogen effluvium is the name given to hair loss that is caused when a large percentage of scalp hair follicles are shifted into the telogen or "shedding phase" of hair growth. See The Hair Growth Cycle for more information. The cause of this abnormally timed telogen phase may be hormonal, nutritional, drug-related or associated with stress.

Loose-Anagen Syndrome

Loose-anagen syndrome occurs most frequently in fair-haired persons. During the anagen (growth) cycle of hair, scalp hairs sit so loosely in the follicles from which they grow that they can be easily extracted by combing or brushing. The condition may appear in childhood and gradually improve or disappear over time.

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